English

生きて行く上で大切なこと

Important things in life

出来ない事に目を向けるのではなく、できる事に目を向けて生きる

To focus on what you can do, not what you cannot do

自分には無限の可能性があると信じること

To believe that you have unlimited possibilities

3   変えれることは、変える努力をして、変えられないことは、受け入れること

To do your best on what you can do, while accepting what you cannot do

4   出来ないことは、出来ないと割り切り、人に委ねること

To give up on things you cannot do and ask others to do them

5   いつも希望を持つこと

To hold onto your hope

6    試練にあったら、なぜこんな試練に合うのですかと不満を言うのでなく、この試練から 何を学ぶのですかと祈ること

When you are faced with a challenge, you pray and ask what you can learn from this, in front of griping what you are faced with that challenge

7    向上心を失わないこと

Not to give up on improving

8   自分の使命を考えて、行動すること

To think what your mission is and act in accordance with it

9   新しい事に挑戦する勇気を、いつも持つこと

To keep up the courage to challenge new things

10   疲れたら、休む事  無理は禁物

To rest when you are tired. Don’t strain yourself

11    不平、不満を言わなく、みずから行動すること

Show with your action, not with gripes or complaints

12    生かされていることに感謝すること

To be thankful that you are alive

13  人のためにいきること(社会に貢献すること)

To live for others (to contribute to society)

14  人を愛すること

To love people

15  自分で自分のことを尊い存在だと思うこと

To think you are a precious being

 

いかに生きるか

How to live

・自分は価値ある世界で一人の人間だと思い、他人と比較することなく自分の人生をいきる。

To think you are the one and only precious person and live a life of yours without compared with lives of others

・失敗したことはすぐに忘れて、負の感情をひきずらない。

To forget what you have erred, not to be dragged down by negative feelings

・自分で自分の能力を低く見積もらない

Not to underestimate your abilities

・すきなことは、できると信じておこなう。

To carry out things you like, believing that you can achieve them

・寂しい、悲しいと負の感情におそわれたら、注意をほかのものにむける。例えば音楽を聴く

When hit by negative feelings, such as  loneliness or sadness, turn your attention to other things - such as listening to music

・今日出来なくとも、いつかできると信じる。

To believe that, if you can’t do it today, you can do it sometime

・失敗しても、なんどでも挑戦する。

To try to accomplish something many times even if you have failed to do so

・何事にも興味をもつ

To become interesting in everything

・初めか出来ないと、諦めない。

Not to give up even if you fail to achieve it in your first try

・何事もポジティブに考える。

To think everything positively

10

・失敗は成功の元。失敗にめげない。

Failures make a success. Do not give up.

・悲観的に考えない。人に希望を届ける人生を歩む。

Do not feel pessimistic and live a life giving hope to other people.

・試練には、必ず脱出の道があると信じる。

To believe that there should be a way out of difficulties

・いつも希望を持つ。

To keep up your hope

・認知症になっても、できなくなること増えるができることもたくさんある

When you have dementia, there are many things you grow unable to do. But there are also many things you can do.

・借り物ではなく、自分の人生を生きる

To live a life of your own, not a life of someone else

・生きるには苦難はつきものだと思う

To realize that life comes with difficulties

・試練によって、人格が成長すると考える。

To think that challenges help you grow as a person

・試練により人間性がます。失敗しても、悔いのない人生を送る。

To think that your humanity grows with challenges. To live a life without regrets, even if you make a mistake

・リスクを覚悟(おかしても)に、悔いのない人生をおくる。

To live a life without regrets, even if that comes with risks

20

・出来ないことは、人に委ねる。

To ask others to do things you cannot do yourself

・無い物ねだりをしない。

Not to wish for something you can’t have

・現状に満足する。

To be content with the way it is

・大きな負担にならない程度に頑張る。

To work hard without overburdening yourself

・何事も、できると信じて行う。

To believe that you can get anything done

・縁の下の力として、栄光をもとめない。

To help others without asking for credit; don’t live for a glory

・毎日、生かされていることに感謝して生きる。

To be thankful that you are alive everybody

・同じ失敗をしない。

Not to make the same mistakes

・何事も、前向きに考える。

To think positively about everything

・いつまでも、くよくよしない。

Not to fret

30

・負の感情が起ったら別のことに注意を向ける。

To turn your attention away if negative feelings try to control you

・いきずまったら、人のために生きることを考える。

To think of living for others when you run up against a wall

・どんな時にも、希望を捨てない。

Never to give up hope

・いまに、きっといい事があると信じる。

To believe that good things will happen soon

・人の意見は参考程度に考える。

To take the opinions of others in stride

・人の人生に土足で踏み入らない。

Not to intrude on other people’s lives

・自分の行動には、責任を持つ。

To take responsibility for your actions

・決断力した事に、くよくよしない。最善の道だと信じる。

To never question your own decision. Believe that your decision is the best way forward

・自分の決断には、責任を持ち、人のせいにしない。

To take responsibility for your decisions and not to blame others for them

・負の感情が起こったら、楽しい事に注意を向ける。

To focus on something fun when you are hit by negative feelings

40

・案ずるより、うむがやすし。なりゆきにまかせる。

It’s easier to do something than worrying about it. See what happens

・とりこり苦労はしない。

Not to worry too much in advance

・悪い事が起こったら必ず良いことも起こると信じる。

To think that a bad event is always followed by something good

・何事も、言語にして、考えをまとめる。

To turn your thoughts into words

・無用な心配はしない。なったらなった時。

Not to worry too much. When it happens, it happens

・負のスパイラルに陥らない。

Not to fall into a spiral of negativity

・悲劇の主人公にならない。

Not to make yourself a tragic hero

・いきずまった、視点,発想をかえる。

Change your perspective and mindset when you run up against a wall

・ちいさなことに、くよくよしない。

 

Not to fret over small things

希望と尊厳のある暮らし

A life with hope and dignity

 

For me, a life with hope and dignity means

a life where I can satisfy my clothing, housing and living needs,

don’t have to worry excessively about future,

where I can get my wishes heard, if not met,

have people to talk to when I feel lonely or worried,

have a role to play,

have something to look forward to in daily life,

can spend a fulfilling time painting works as part of clinical art,

have the freedom to eat out, watch movies or visit museums,

have the freedom to take a walk when I like,

have a place to talk with other people with dementia,

where I’m not ignored and can have my stories heard,

can go traveling sometimes,

can receive support for using convenient devices, such as PCs and iPads,

have the freedom to go out,

can do what I want to do, such as appearing on TV,

can live positively with hope,

can receive the support of an escort when I attend various events or meetings,

can do what l like do when I want to,

can be treated as a precious being even if I can’t do anything special,

can eat what I like at times,

can occasionally buy and read interesting books without reservations,

can receive adequate health care,

can receive adequate nursing care,

where I have the mental and physical strength to do something,

can think of ways to enjoy life no matter how tough my challenges (hardships) are,

where what kind of life it is, I and we deserve a life with dignity.

 

Let’s think about your own life with hope and dignity.

 

 

 

認知症当事者にとって住みよい社会とは

A society that is friendly to people with dementia

 

- A society in which people ask you if there’s anything they can do, such as when you are lost for directions

- A mature society where nobody complains to you at the cashier for taking time to make the payment

- A society where people can make a living doing what they love, even if you are slow at work

- A society where people treat you equally, instead of looking down on you, and where they enjoy things together with you

- A society that tolerates your mistakes

- A slow-life society where people can live slowly and are not required to put efficiency first

- A society not dictated by the law of the jungle, a society that is friendly to the vulnerable

- A diverse society that respects various different values

- A humane society where people with disabilities and vulnerabilities are not discriminated against

- A gentle society where people can imagine what others feel

- A kind society where people give up their seats for others

- A gentle society where people don’t claim rights or make arguments for themselves only, but where people can understand the position of others

- A society where people help each other by giving and cooperating, thinking that everyone should do so when times are tough

- A society where vulnerable members of society are given a role to play and can shine

 

Let’s think of a society that is friendly to you, and let’s work together create a society that is friendly to people who get dementia.

 

 

 

 

 

Masahiko Sato, Representative of Japan Dementia Working Group

 

Born in Gifu Prefecture, Japan, in 1954, I graduated Meijo University in Nagoya with a degree in Science and Technology. After teaching mathematics at a secondary school, I moved on to become a system engineer in a private computer company. 

 

When I was 32 years old, I fell ill, just when I was in what seemed to be the busiest period of my life. I had bought my own apartment and was a chairman of the board of directors for the community which housed 133 households. I had to take a temporary leave of absence from work, followed by a career setback after being transferred to a clerical position that did not match my skills. Having lost motivation in my job, I began to attend church services and became a Christian when I was 39. 

 

At the age of 45, I was no longer able to take meeting minutes at work. Due to my impaired memory, I had to take a two-year leave from work. I did resume work, but the company decided that I was no longer able to do clerical work and I was transferred to delivery service. For about two years, I could fulfill my delivery tasks without any problems, but gradually I began to lose confidence in my ability to deliver packages to the right place. I even had trouble finding my way back to my car for half an hour when I took the wrong exit at the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Headquarters. 

 

It was when I was 51 that I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s type of dementia after consulting a psychiatrist, and taking a CT scan and identifying signs of atrophy in my brain. All they gave me was a diagnosis that I had dementia, but nothing at all about what this disease was all about. Shocked with the diagnosis, my mind went blank. I felt totally lost and went home in a daze. Shocked by the diagnosis, I no longer had the energy to continue my job, and after a three-month absence, I retired from work. 

 

A little after my diagnosis, I started purchasing books about Alzheimer’s disease at bookshops, and tried to find out about the disease. The information I read said that I would eventually be confined at home, unable to make my own judgements, and in many cases, within six to ten years, I would need to be under full nursing care. The more I learned about the disease, the more I felt my energy and hope in life drain away. Every day became an agony to live, and I could no longer live on my own, and so I returned to my hometown in Gifu. I spent 50 days or so in my hometown, during which I gradually began to gain strength. I once again returned to Saitama, and it was from then on that I began to focus on what I can do, rather than on what I can’t do. 

 

I became aware of two prejudices in my life with dementia. One is the prejudice I had within me. I had the biased view that once you had dementia, you wouldn’t know anything. In the beginning, I took this at face value, and believed that I would no longer be able to do anything, which caused me to believe my life was without meaning, and I gradually became unable to do things for myself. The other is the prejudice in society. People see people with dementia as having no memory, think they can no longer make judgements for themselves, and thus no longer treated you as mature individuals. People with dementia must lead a life with this dual prejudice.  

 

Masahiko Sato, Representative of Japan Dementia Working Group

 

Born in Gifu Prefecture, Japan, in 1954, I graduated Meijo University in Nagoya with a degree in Science and Technology. After teaching mathematics at a secondary school, I moved on to become a system engineer in a private computer company. 

 

When I was 32 years old, I fell ill, just when I was in what seemed to be the busiest period of my life. I had bought my own apartment and was a chairman of the board of directors for the community which housed 133 households. I had to take a temporary leave of absence from work, followed by a career setback after being transferred to a clerical position that did not match my skills. Having lost motivation in my job, I began to attend church services and became a Christian when I was 39. 

 

At the age of 45, I was no longer able to take meeting minutes at work. Due to my impaired memory, I had to take a two-year leave from work. I did resume work, but the company decided that I was no longer able to do clerical work and I was transferred to delivery service. For about two years, I could fulfill my delivery tasks without any problems, but gradually I began to lose confidence in my ability to deliver packages to the right place. I even had trouble finding my way back to my car for half an hour when I took the wrong exit at the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Headquarters. 

 

It was when I was 51 that I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s type of dementia after consulting a psychiatrist, and taking a CT scan and identifying signs of atrophy in my brain. All they gave me was a diagnosis that I had dementia, but nothing at all about what this disease was all about. Shocked with the diagnosis, my mind went blank. I felt totally lost and went home in a daze. Shocked by the diagnosis, I no longer had the energy to continue my job, and after a three-month absence, I retired from work. 

 

A little after my diagnosis, I started purchasing books about Alzheimer’s disease at bookshops, and tried to find out about the disease. The information I read said that I would eventually be confined at home, unable to make my own judgements, and in many cases, within six to ten years, I would need to be under full nursing care. The more I learned about the disease, the more I felt my energy and hope in life drain away. Every day became an agony to live, and I could no longer live on my own, and so I returned to my hometown in Gifu. I spent 50 days or so in my hometown, during which I gradually began to gain strength. I once again returned to Saitama, and it was from then on that I began to focus on what I can do, rather than on what I can’t do. 

 

I became aware of two prejudices in my life with dementia. One is the prejudice I had within me. I had the biased view that once you had dementia, you wouldn’t know anything. In the beginning, I took this at face value, and believed that I would no longer be able to do anything, which caused me to believe my life was without meaning, and I gradually became unable to do things for myself. The other is the prejudice in society. People see people with dementia as having no memory, think they can no longer make judgements for themselves, and thus no longer treated you as mature individuals. People with dementia must lead a life with this dual prejudice.  

 


A message from a person with dementia

By Masahiko Sato

 

Foreword

 

On Oct. 27, 2005, I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. When I got the diagnosis from a doctor, my mind went blank. I couldn’t even ask a question.

I was only 51 years at the time.

Since I could not get enough explanation about the illness from my doctor, I went to bookstores and libraries, reading every book I could find on Alzheimer’s. But as my knowledge deepened, I started feeling hopeless.

Every book I read said, “Once you get dementia, you can’t think,” or “You can’t lead a normal life,”  “You will lose a sense of yourself,” or “You will lose your will or feelings.”

 

Is dementia a scary disease as people say? After I got dementia, I have more things I can no longer do. But I realized that there are many things I can still do. 

It’s been nine years since I got the diagnosis, but I still live on my own. I have many abilities left even though I have dementia. The biased information and misconceptions on dementia that exist in society affect those with dementia, making them believe as if such information and perceptions are true. This “double prejudice” robs people with dementia of their ability and hope to live.

It is my wish to remove such misunderstandings and prejudices about dementia.

 

You cannot judge people by their ability or inability to do things. You are who you are, and nothing will change that. Life with dementia is inconvenient, but not unhappy. You can decide how to live your life, and act on it.

“I will not give up my life even though I have dementia.”

That’s how I have lived my life. 

What I will say in this book might not be universally common among all people with dementia. But if you could listen, even just for a minute, I would be really happy.

  

Chapter 4: A message from a person with dementia

 

To people who have dementia

You might be worried if you have dementia.

You have just been diagnosed with dementia and are at a loss what to do.

You are stressed out by all the inconveniences in life.

You live every day with the help of others.

Many people are in such phases now.

Let’s live each day, and the rest of your life, meaningfully.

Let’s believe in the abilities you still have, instead of fret over or mourning what you can do no longer.

It is possible to have an enjoyable and fulfilling life even after getting dementia.

Let’s remain hopeful, instead of despairing.

You are who you are, even if the list of things you cannot do grows. Use your time on what you like to do, especially because you have dementia, without worrying what others think of you or comparing yourself with others.

Don’t try too hard by youself. Let’s reach out to other people with the same disease. If you can’t find friends with dementia, please contact “Mittsu no Kai,” a group for people with dementia. 

And let’s muster up your courage to tell people around you what you feel and think.

By speaking out, you can eliminate misunderstandings and prejudices about dementia, and change society.

Don’t give your life up even if you get dementia.

I will not give up, either.

 

To families 

There are times when intentions of people with dementia are ignored and things about them are decided only by their family members.

It’s not that people with dementia are not thinking. They are just unable to make a judgment or find words for their thoughts quickly. People with dementia might say or ask the same things over and over again, but that’s because of their memory problems. Please listen to them.

People with dementia feel guilty about being cared for by family members. If there are roles they can play or tasks they can perform, such as with housework, please assign the tasks to them. That way, they can realize that they are useful, and that gives them confidence.

If they don’t do anything, their illness will progress fast. By giving them tasks, I think their illness’ progress can be delayed.

People with dementia don’t want their family members to be exhausted by taking care of them. Please use the local resources you have, such as short-stay programs, and have time for yourself.

You might hear various kinds of information about how to care for family members with dementia. But such information might not be accurate, because dementia is a different experience for everyone. 

The opinions of other people are not yours. If you cannot do what others recommend, please don’t blame yourself.

I think not only people with dementia but also their family members tend to feel isolated.

There must be quite a few people who cannot attend local meetings organized by family members of those with dementia, because they cannot keep their eyes off the sick ones at home. But if you attend the meetings, you will know that many others feel the same way as you, and you will be able to share many problems you are facing.

 

To everyone

Nobody chooses to get dementia.

I saw my life, including my everyday life, change significantly after getting dementia.

It’s unfortunate to get dementia, but life with dementia is not unhappy.

There are many things you can do, though you might lose your ability to do many other things.

People with dementia are not people who cannot think. They can lead a spiritually rich life. 

They are not just subjects of medicine or care; they are always leading a life that is valuable to them.

They are members of our society, who can make contributions to the world, through what they want to do, the jobs they can perform, and by working as volunteers. 

People with dementia are not “burdens” to society. Rather, they are the living proof that we can all maintain dignity and live our own lives even as we grow old and life gets more inconvenient.

Let us together create a society where people - those with dementia and countless others who might get dementia sometime in the future - can live happily with dementia.

The value of a human being is not decided by his or her ability. People are all valuable, regardless of ability. 

I want to keep expressing the thoughts of a person with dementia to everyone in society.

 

Epilogue

 

When I received the dementia diagnosis, every value that I had built up in my life collapsed. To recover from despair I had to recreate a new set of values.

It takes time for someone who has lost his sense of purpose to find new ones. But I have overcome hardships, encouraged by the following passage in the Bible:

No temptation has overtaken you except what is common to mankind. And God is faithful; he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, he will also provide a way out so that you can endure it. (1 Corinthians 10:13)

 

After struggling and agonizing, I noticed that it is truly wonderful to live with a passion. Even if other people think it’s boring, it’s enough if the person doing it can be passionate about it.

Everyone’s life is different. Rather, it’s more valuable for your life to be different from others’.

The value of a human being is not decided by his or her ability. If the value of someone is decided by how useful they are, life is hopeless, because, with age, human abilities are lost.

People are valuable for who they are, regardless of their ability. Believe that you are valuable, even if you cannot help anybody. 

I will live, using what I can do to the best of my ability, instead of mourning over what I can do no longer. 

I believe that I have infinite possibilities and will not be afraid of making mistakes.

Finally, I would like to express my gratitude to Ms. Kumiko Nagata of the Tokyo Dementia Care Research And Training Center and Mr. Hirotaka Nishi, an editor at the Otsuki Shoten publishing house, for their enormous assistance in publishing this book.

 

 

 

 

Life with dementia comes with many inconveniences, but not necessarily unhappiness.


伝えたいこと

 

What I Want to Share with You

 

-A Message of a Person with Dementia-

 

 

 

 

 

Masahiko Sato

 

Representative, Forum for People Affected by Dementia

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Diagnosis and Now

 

 

 

I am 61 years old now. I graduated from a university with a degree in engineering. After teaching mathematics at a middle high school for a short time, I got employed at a computer retail company, changing my career to be a system engineer. Around 1999, I started having problems with writing down the minutes of meeting at work. I could not memorize model numbers and quantities of computer goods, and I noticed that I would spend much longer time to input information. So I took a sick leave for some time, and returned to the workplace as a delivery man. Then I started to leave behind carts at delivery sites, while spending as long as 30 minutes looking for my car. Eventually, I made an appointment with a clinical psychiatrist. The doctor took my CT scan, and atrophy was found in my brain. I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

 

I live by myself now, with a support of a home helper who visits me twice a week. What I like most is to appreciate the flowers blooming at the dike of Arakawa River. It really makes me feel that “I am alive.”

 

 

 

 

 

  1. I Make My Own Life

     

    I experience so many troubles and inconveniences in my daily life, due to my dementia. I developed my own tactics to cope with them. Below are some of the examples.

     

 

  • I wake up in the morning and check the date, the day of the week, and the schedule of the day.

  • I input the information of what I did on the day into my computer, once in the morning, and again in the afternoon. Otherwise, I would forget what I did.

  • I use emails, not telephones, to confirm when and where to meet people, so that I can check the information again and again by reading emails.

  • I use an alarm clock function and a personal calendar application in my mobile phone, to remember to take my prescription drugs.

  • When I go shopping, I bring my list of “things to buy” and “things never to buy.”

  • When I turn on fire in my kitchen, I will never do anything else, so as not to forget that fire is on.

  • I upload my daily events to Facebook so as to keep my connection with society.

 

 

 

There are many things a person with dementia cannot do. However, there are still many other things that such a person can do. Many functions remain with the person. The condition of what are able and what remain differ much, depending on the person. In my case, I make use of computer and mobile phone in my daily life. These are indispensable tools that compensate for my memory loss.

 

 

 

  1. How I Wish a Society to Be

     

    Living with dementia, I came to know that there are two stigmas. I found one inside of myself. It is a prejudice (or stigma) that says “I would not be able to do anything.” There were times when I thought that I could be paralyzed by the fear of failing that says “I would keep on failing.” The other stigma exists in society. It says that “I cannot think anymore. I cannot understand anymore.” These stigmas are two-fold, taking away my power of living and obscuring my hope for living my life with dementia.

     

    I have several wishes to be granted by people in communities and in society.

 

  • Do not get at mistakes of us the people with dementia. Do not make fun of them, nor laugh about them.

  • Do not regard us as worthless, valueless existence.

  • People should be able to wait patiently when we get muddled at supermarket or information desk of train stations. That is what I think an ideal society should be.

  • We the people with dementia can go out when we feel like and do what we want to do. That is what I think an ideal town should be.

  • We want to be respected as a member of society to which we also contribute to create. Do not look at us as a burden of society or an object of care.

     

 

It is true that we have more inconveniences living with dementia, but it never means that is an unhappy thing. Given that we have about 4.5 million people with dementia (in Japan), I encourage you to think hard how these people can live their lives more positively with hope. I would ask you to give us your small help to each one of us.

 

 

 

  1. How I Overcame My Hardship

     

    When I started to think low of myself, I hummed the following verse of Bible. Then I felt that God said this insignificant me is precious. I kept on telling myself that I am worthy, and overcame hardships.

     

 

“Since you are precious and honored in my sight and because I love you.” (Isaiah 43:4)

 

Another verse that helped me overcoming challenges is,

 

 

 

“There hath no temptation taken hold of you but such as is common to man. But God is faithful; He will not suffer you to be tempted beyond that which ye are able to bear, but with the temptation will also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.” (1 Corinthians 10:13)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

認知症とともに歩む人たちへ    

 

To All Those Living With Dementia 

 

日本認知症ワーキングクループ共同代表 佐藤雅彦

 

Co-Representative of Japan Dementia Working Group  

 

Masahiko Sato

 

 

 

  • 認知症になったら、人生終わりではない、残された機能に感謝して、素晴らしい人生が待っていると信じて精一杯生きる。

  • It’s not the end of the world when you get dementia. Be grateful for what still works – and go on believing that you have a wonderful life to lead.

     

 

  • なにもできないとなげくのではなく、いまできることリストを書き出し、それを実行する。そうすると、生活に張りが出てくる。

  • Don’t dwell on the negatives – list all that you can do now and just do it so that you enjoy an active life.

     

  • 必ずできると信じて、ものごとを行う。

  • Do things with the belief that you can succeed.

     

  • 初めから、やりもせずに、できないとあきらめない。

  • You must not give up without giving it a go.

     

 

  • 自分で自分の能力を低くみつもらない。

  • Don’t underestimate your abilities.

     

  • なにごとにも、挑戦する勇気を失わない。

  • Don’t lack courage – give everything a try.

     

  • 取り越し苦労をしない。

  • Don’t worry about what may never happen.

     

  • 自分はダメな人間だと思わない。

  • Don’t give in to low self-esteem.

     

  • 自分には無限の可能性あると、信じて生きる。

  • Live your life to your maximum potential.

  • 好きなことを記録して、楽しく過ごす。

  • Be happy – and make a note of all your favourite things.

     

  • 失敗した記録ばかりとり、負のスパイラルに落ちいらない。

  • Don’t go into a downward spiral by dwelling on failures.

     

  • 何事にも興味を持つ。(食わず嫌いにならない。)

  • Be curious – and show your interest in the world around you.

     

  • 人になにかができないかを常にかんがえ、積極的にいきる。

  • Live a positive life by always thinking how you can support others.

     

  • 幸せでないと思うときは、自分の価値観を疑い、価値観の修正を試みる。

  • When you feel low just reconfigure your perspective and try to adjust your outlook.

     

  • 自分は、価値のある人間だと思う。

  • Develop a sense of your own value and worth.

     

  • 自分で自分を好きになる。

  • Try to love yourself.

     

  • 認知行動療法を勉強して、前向きに生きる。

  • Learn and apply CBT methods (Cognitive Behaviour Therapy) to strengthen your wellbeing.

     

  • 失敗は成功の基だと思い、少しの失敗にヘコ足らない

  • Don’t get upset by small setbacks – they are essential steps on the path to success.

     

  • 他人から何がしてもらうと考えずに、他人に何ができるかを考える。

  • Ask yourself not what others can do for you – but what you can do for others.

     

  • もらうことより、与えることのほうが幸せであると考える。

  • Embrace the concept that giving is much better than receiving.

     

  • 常に社会にどう貢献できるかかんがえる。

  • Always think about how you can contribute to the world around you.

  • 自分の使命を常に考える。

  • Always keep you mind on your personal mission in life.

     

  • できないことばかりに、目を向けるのではなく、できることに目を向けて生きる。

  • Live your life positively – do not dwell on what you cannot achieve, focus on what you can do.

     

  • 自分に残された能力に感謝して生きる。

  • Be thankful for all you can still achieve.

     

  • ないものねだりをせずに、現状に満足して生きる。

  • Be happy with what you have – do not cry for the moon.

     

  • 人生は1度しかない、失敗しても、悔いのない人生をおくる。

  • We only have one life – so live it to the full – mistakes and all.

     

  • 失敗をおそれずに、いろいろなことにとりくむ。失敗にめげない。

  • Be brave – be adventurous – don’t dwell on the possibility of making mistakes.

     

  • 試練は、人間の人格を磨くためにあると考える。

  • Challenges strengthen the character.

     

  • 試練には必ず脱出のみちがあると考える。

  • There is always a way out of hardship.

     

  • 困難なことは,たまには起こると考え、永遠に続くと考えない。

  • Problems will occur – but they will be overcome.

     

  • 何事にもくよくよしない。

  • Be positive – don’t dwell on the negatives.

     

  • いまの苦難は、永遠に続くのではなく、必ず希望があると信じる。

  • Today may be difficult – tomorrow is a brand new day – bringing hope.

     

  • 「そうはいっても、できない」と否定的に考えず、できる方法があると信じて考え

  • Don’t give in to doubts – be strong – and always believe in the possibility of a solution.

 

 

伝えたい事

認知症になっても、できなくなることも多いが、できることもたくさんある

 

Even though I have dementia, the many things I can no longer do are also accompanied by many things I can do.

 

 

 

認知症になると不便なことが増えるが、決して不幸ではない。

 

Having dementia has led to more inconveniences, but this does not necessarily mean I am unhappy.

 

 

 

認知症になっても、絶望することなく、生活の仕方の工夫を紹介して、希望を持て生きる。

 

Even though I have dementia, I have introduced ways to be creative in my lifestyle without giving in to despair and continue living with hope.

 

 

 

認知症になっても、人生をあきらめない。

 

Even though I have dementia, I have not given up on living.

 

 

 

認知症への偏見は認知症当事者も信じて生きる力を奪うので、この偏見をなくしたい。

 

Even people suffering from dementia may find themselves believing the distorted views of others about this illness, and end up robbed of their will to live. I want to find ways to eliminate these distortions.

 

 

 

認知症になったからこそ、他人を気にせず、自分の好きなことをしてもらいたい。

 

It is particularly when people develop dementia that they should do the things they like without giving any mind to others.

 

 

 

不便さを乗り越えて、自分の生活を張り合い持つように工夫して、充実した人生を送ってもらいたい。

 

I want people to overcome inconveniences and make adjustments to maintain zest in their own lifestyles and lead more complete lives.

 

 

 

私の生き方を参考にして、自分らしく生き方を模索して、残りの人生、悔いのないよう生きてほしい。

 

I want others to look at my way of living as a positive example, in their search to find their own way of living so that they live the rest of their lives without regrets.

 

 

 

私は、認知症になってから、新たに覚えたことがたくさんあることを伝えたい

 

What I want to convey to you is the fact that I have learned many new things ever since I developed dementia.

 

 

 

失った機能を数えたり、歎いたりするのではなく、残された能力を信じて、悔いのない人生をおくってもらいたい。

 

You should neither count what you can no longer do nor lament their loss. Instead, I hope you would instead believe in what you are still capable of and live your lives to the fullest.

 

 

 

認知症になっても、認知症に負けない人生をおくってもらいたい。

 

Even if you have dementia, I hope you lead your live without giving in to it.

 

 

 

新しいことでも、始める前からできないだろうと思わず、まずはじめてみて、過度にストレスを感じるようだとやめる。

 

When trying something new, don't think you cannot do it even before you start. First, give it a try without getting too stressed about it.

 

 

 

認知症当事者は何も考えられないとではなく、豊かな精神活動を営むことができる人ととらえてほしい。

 

It is not true that people with dementia can't think for themselves. I want you to know that people with dementia can lead spiritually fulfilling lives.

 

 

 

認知症当事者を介護の対象だけの存在ではなく、私たちが形成する社会の一員とみとめて欲しい

 

People with dementia are not simply people who need to be taken care of. We want others to identify as other members of society, too, as we all weave the fabric of society.

 

 

 

他人と比較することなく、なにができなくとも、自分は価値のある尊い存在だと信じて生活してもらいたい

 

I hope you do not compare yourself with others but instead see your existence itself as precious and life as valuable, despite any inabilities you may have.

 

 

 

辛い厳しい試練にあうかもしれないが、かならず脱出の道があると信じて生きてほしい

 

Although you may face terrible ordeals, I want you to live your lives believing you will find a way through them.

 

 

 

試練におしつぶされるのではなく、積極的に生きて欲しい

 

Don't let the challenges ahead rob you of your will. I hope you try to live with a positive attitude.

 

 

 

パソコン、携帯電話をうまく生活にとりいれ、生活に不便を感じない実例をしめしたい

 

I want to present myself as an example of a good lifestyle led with a PC and mobile phone, which have helped me get past inconveniences in life.

 

 

 

私の生きる姿をとおして認知症当事者が希望をもって生きる姿をしめしたい

 

I want people with dementia to use my way of living as an example to help them to go forward with hope in their own lives.

 

 

 

認知症が進行する前に、旅行、コンサート、芝居などに行き楽しい思い出をたくさん作り、人生を楽しみたい。

 

Before my dementia progresses any further, I want to create many pleasant memories and enjoy life, such as by traveling, going to concerts, and watching plays.

 

 

 

ボランティアを通じて、社会に貢献していきたい。決して認知症当事者は社会のお荷物的存在ではないことを示したい。

 

I hope to contribute to society by participating in volunteer activities. I want others to understand that people with dementia are not a burden on society.

 

 

 

毎日を生かされているのが、今日が生かされている最後日だとおもい感謝して、過ごすこと

 

The important thing is to live one's life with a sense of gratitude by considering each day a gift and imagining today will be the last day I am blessed with life.

 

 

 

 

 


 

JAPAN TIMES 英字新聞記事2016.1.4

 

Sato is a living example of how people with dementia can live actively and independently — with help and understanding from others.

 

Sato, 61, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s in 2005, has made full use of digital tools to make up for his memory lapses. Creative use of such tools allowed the Gifu Prefecture native to live on his own for 10 years before moving to a care facility in June 2015, he said.

 

Sato, who lives in Kawaguchi, Saitama Prefecture, has made it a habit to turn his computer on and check his Google calendar when he gets up every morning. While dementia patients are known to lose track of time, the calendar shows which day of the month it is, a convenient feature not available in a handwritten organizer.

 

Before he goes out, he sets several timers on his mobile phone around the scheduled appointment. Using a train timetable and route finder software, he makes sure he gets an alert on his phone while on the train so he won’t forget where to get off.

 

Sato published a book in 2014 on his experiences as a dementia patient: “Ninchisho ni natta watashi ga tsutaetaikoto” (“The Message I, as a Dementia Sufferer, Want to Tell”). The book, which won an award last year from the Medical Journalist Association of Japan, is most likely the first book in Japan written entirely by someone with dementia, according to the book’s publisher, Otsuki Shoten.

 

Though Sato used to work as a systems engineer for a computer company before his diagnosis, he said he started using social media and an iPad only years after he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. He recommends that other patients start using such tools in the early stages of their illness.

 

Sato, who now has more than 1,300 friends on Facebook, makes frequent public speeches around the country, spreading the message that life with dementia comes with many inconveniences, but not necessarily unhappiness.

 

For people with dementia to live a fulfilling life, however, the widespread prejudice that they are helpless and powerless, and that they can only be burdens to society, needs to be eradicated, he said.

 

“I want to participate in society,” he said emphatically during a recent interview. “In the future, I would like to organize a group of volunteers who clean the park and around the stations in the Kawaguchi area.”

 

Sato acknowledges that his health condition fluctuates and sometimes deteriorates to a point he has to cancel an important appointment at the last minute. Still, he keeps a positive outlook on life, and that seems to have made a big difference in slowing the progress of his Alzheimer’s.

 

“When you get dementia, it’s not the end of the world,” he said. “Be grateful for whatever abilities you still have — and go on believing that you have a wonderful life to lead.”